Warmth of Creativity

Warmth does not only come from heat fixtures and fireplaces; it comes from upholstery and color choices too!

Here at Divine Interiors, we love our seasonal colors. If you’re not looking to reupholster or change your entire space, consider holiday-friendly accessories. This makes the transition after your holiday celebrations that much easier!

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Take these candle holders for example, a true compliment on light or dark woods. With a shimmery gold or red candle on top, these will really add heat to your holiday and pizazz to the room! Come spring, these solid-wood candle holders can be topped with playful colors such as peach or yellow to match the season!

 

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Imagine simply having to replace your spring colored candles with light blue or other beach friendly colors to give your home that Summer-time look! These candle holders would do great as a centerpiece, on a side-table, or even separated around your living room furniture.

This fun asymmetrical candle holder would be a beautiful compliment to winter decor. These make a wonderful addition to any room that is already booming with color or pattern!

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Come check out the variety of decor and furniture options at Divine interiors, we carry your favorite high-end lighting and furniture brands!

The 3 Principles of Interior Design

A beautifully decorated interior not only functions well but it creates a mood or a feeling and shows off the personality of the family that lives there. It’s attention to these three important ingredients — function, mood and personality — that ensures decorating success.

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Before painting and rearranging, spend some time thinking about your family and how you live. Look through magazines for inspiration and pull out ideas or rooms that appeal to you. Gather things from around the house that make you feel good and study them carefully for color cues and perhaps a clue to the mood you’re looking for in your home. This is the beginning of a well-planned and decorated living area.

As for the rest, let’s start with function.

Function

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Decorating is more than just eye appeal — it’s making a room really work for you. Here’s how to do it, element by element:

  • The focal point:

focal pointSometimes rooms have natural focal points (places the eyes travel to immediately upon entering a room) — a fireplace, a bay window with a view, maybe even a built-in bookcase. If the room doesn’t have a natural focal point, create one with a dynamic piece of art or a colorful area rug.

  • The furniture:

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Determine whether the furniture satisfies the functions you’ve planned for the room. If a piece isn’t working or if it’s too large or too small for the size of the room, get rid of it or trade it for something else around the house that may be more appropriate.

  • The lighting:

lightingLighting should be selected for the functions of the room as well as for visual appeal. Every task will require either direct lighting from a lamp or indirect lights that simply brighten the room for conversation or TV-watching. Accent lighting — floor spots, track lighting or recessed spotlights — enhance texture, color and room details.

  • The furniture arrangement:

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Draw your room on graph paper. Measure and mark electrical outlets and switches, vents, windows and doors. Measure your furniture and place it in your floor plan. Generally, the main furniture pieces are directed toward the focal point, keeping the major traffic patterns open. Fill in with pieces you’d like to have that may or may not be available now. Be sure to balance high and low pieces as well as heavy and light ones around the room.

Mood

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The mood or feeling of a room is created by your choice of colors, the style of furnishings, the amount of texture and pattern you choose and your accessories. Since there’s so much to think about when creating a mood, establishing a theme through the selection of an inspiration piece can make this portion of a decorating project much more fun and interesting. Here are the factors you need to address when setting a mood:

  • The inspiration piece:

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The easiest way by far to decorate is to start with some source of inspiration. A decorative pillow, a favorite scarf and even a magazine photo are good places to begin. Select your inspiration piece wisely, and be sure it makes you feel good when you look at it. It’s the basis for selecting your theme, colors, patterns and textures.

  • Theme:

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Analyze your inspiration piece and develop a theme name for it. For instance, a needlepoint pillow with a botanical design on a black background may inspire a title like “formal botanical garden.” Be descriptive with your theme name and all sorts of supporting ideas will come to mind. Botanical prints, striped walls, greens and floral colors, formal fabrics and furniture, dark woods and black accents all fit this particular theme.

  • Color cues:

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Color should always support the theme. Many times, the colors that are most appropriate are found in the patterns and design of your inspiration piece. Generally, it’s best to choose three colors in a room: a dominant color, used for walls, carpeting and fabric backgrounds; a secondary color, found throughout the room in fabrics and accessories; and an accent color, used sparingly to give energy and excitement to the room.

  • Patterns:

furniture-patternsStripes, checks, florals and plaids are just a few of the patterns to consider as you continue supporting your theme. It’s all right to mix patterns as long as you do three things:

  1. Keep the background color the same.
  2. Make sure all patterns share the same colors.
  3. Vary the scale or sizes of the patterns.
  • Texture:

new-texture-collage2 Too many smooth, shiny objects or too much nubby, rustic texture becomes tiresome. Use variety to keep the room interesting. Even a pattern can be used as texture. Many prints look dimensional and therefore add depth to a decorating scheme.

  • Furniture:

furniture Aside from being functional, your furniture plays an important role in supporting your theme. Some pieces may function well but their style or color may stick out like a sore thumb. Try to salvage it with slipcovers, tablecloths or paint. If it’s a lost cause, remove it from the room.

Personality

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Here’s your chance to put your personal stamp on a well-planned room. Here are some strategies:

  • Accessorizing:

home-decor-collage-500x600Pictures, vases, pillows and area rugs are all integral parts of a great decorating plan. Generally, they should support your theme, but allow more flexibility here; an antique picture frame could add wonderful variety to a contemporary room. Accessories are located on walls, mantels, furniture, tabletops and floors; they can be paintings and photos or pillows.

  • Whimsy:

whimsy This is optional in your decorating scheme, but it can counteract any sterile quality that may have been created by strictly following all the guidelines. A beautiful country sitting room may get some relief from a playful quilt placed over the fireplace.

  • The unexpected:

tinrobotsInterest doesn’t have to be whimsical; it can simply be something unexpected in a room, like a brightly-painted ceiling.

From: HGTV.com

Know your Sofa

Here’s a quick guide to some of the most common types of social seating, from couches and sofas to daybeds and settees, and a few of the most popular styles of sofas.

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 Settee

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Upholstered, in a Neoclassical French style. Settees, as a rule, more closely resemble a chair than they do a sofa. With an upholstered back and seat, and padded arms like a French fauteuil, the settee is comfort and refined style for a social setting. Their popularity grew as chairmakers in the 1600s grew more confident with their skills.

 

Cabriole sofa

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Is named for the sinuous curve of its back and legs, and is a petite, refined seat that was a fixture in French salons. The key is in the back: it’s got an exposed wood frame, often with carved detail, that makes one continuous line from the back into the arms. It’s an extended version of the French bergere, and has no back cushions—only a loose seat cushion.

 

Camelback sofa

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Was a Thomas Chippendale original, named for its elegant sloping back that’s high in the middle, then drops to the same height as its subtly rolled arms. These seats are completely upholstered with exposed wood legs, and feature stuffed seat cushions but a taut, smooth back. Once you know this silhouette, you’ll see it everywhere. Classic, refined, and beautiful from all angles.

2-chair-back settee

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Was the first type of social seating to develop completely separate from the old-fashioned medieval settles. It was essentially two chairs fused together, and ranged in styles from Queen Anne walnut chairs with upholstered seats to Colonial American wagon chairs with rush seats.

Empire-style sofa

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The iconic, cornucopia-armed Empire-style sofa . These behemoths often include bolster-style cushions on each end below their dramatic arms, and have lots of carving on their exposed frames and (sometimes precarious) curved legs. Look for Asian or eagle motifs, and animal’s paw feet.

 

Daybed

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Has come a long way from its origins: it was essentially a wooden chair with an elongated seat stretched out over 6 legs, a form that died out in the 18th century. Nowadays, it has a more versatile appeal, going from social seating to luxurious lounging in a pinch. Chaise longues took their place, and a stylish variation, the recamier (pictured below) features a high, assymetrical side.

 

 

English rolled-arm sofa

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Is a 19th-century classic with versatile, casual style. The arms, in comparison to other sofa silhouettes, are compact and recessed. All-over upholstery, from the tight back to the plush seat cushions, make it a perfect, go-to piece for kicking back.

Recamier

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Is a specific style of chaise longue that has a regal edge: its asymmetrical high side makes it ideal for reclining in style, and was named for Madame Recamier whose portrait was famously painting doing just that.

Chesterfield sofa

Chesterfield

Has an all-over tufted, quilted look, often covered in leather. The dramatically rolled arms are the same height as the back, originally kept low so that men could sit in them without wrinkling their coats.

Tuxedo sofa

tuxedo sofa

Has all the pomp of the Chesterfield, but with a sleek and modern silhouette: its high, straight arms and squared-off back are all the same height, it lacks back cushions, and it features decorative tufts (although, often just one row).

 

Lawson-style sofa

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Is comfortable and casual—a classic that puts the sitter’s needs first without sacrificing good proportion. Unlike the English rolled-arm version, its back cushions are separate from the frame, and it has low, taut arms and feet often covered with a skirt.

Canapé

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Is like a mini-Cabriole sofa, a French-style loveseat with a carved, exposed frame and a continuous back-to-arm shape. It rose to fame in Rococo France under Louis XV, and grew streamlined with the Neoclassical lines of Louis XVI.

Improving A Room: The Design Do’s and Don’ts

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Don’t: Use White Decor If You Have Kids or Pets
“If you have pets or children, white rugs and upholstery are just not in the cards. People love the way they look but never realize that you have to hermetically seal your household to keep them clean.” —Markham Roberts

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Do: Find Inspiration in Your Travels
“Travel as much as you can, and stay on the alert for inspiration wherever you go — you could find a great floor plan in a museum’s period room, or a color in a painting. And don’t just rely on your camera. If you draw something, you’ll really absorb the detail.” —DD Allen

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Don’t: Forget About Seating
“Today everyone likes rooms sparse, but for a living room, you need the sorts of chairs people can pull up together, so that they want to come into the room and sit down and chat.” —Paula Perlini

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Do: Use Dramatic Color in a Small Space
“Color is best used in small spaces that you pass through. A dramatic color in a room where you’re going to be spending a lot of time might feel too heavy or dark, but if you use it in a foyer or pantry, it makes the whole house feel colorful. It also makes the house feel bigger, because it turns a space you might not notice into one that catches your attention.” —John Barman

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Don’t: Be Afraid to Splurge on Great Pieces
“Invest in one great-quality piece. It sometimes hurts in the beginning, but you end up having that piece forever, and it can really carry a room, or even an entire house.” —David Kaihoi

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Do: Test Paint Colors in a Big Way
“When you test paint colors in a room, make big patches so that you can really see if you need to go darker or lighter. I make mine 3 feet by 3 feet.” —Mary Douglas Drysdale

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Don’t: Ignore Architectural Details
“Respect the architecture of a space. That’s not to say you can’t be surprising — I might use period furniture in a modern room, but I’ll make sure the lines and silhouettes are appropriate. The whole room has to hang together.” —Mariette Himes Gomez

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Do: Draw the Eye With an Interesting Piece
“A photographer I worked with taught me the importance of the axial view. When you’re looking down a corridor, you want a wonderful object at the end of it to draw you forward — a sculpture, a chandelier, anything to define the space and pull you in.” —Nancy Braithwaite

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Don’t: Go Overboard
“One of my mentors always said, ‘Just because you can doesn’t mean you should.’ Great projects are the ones that show a little restraint.” —Heather Hilliard

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Do: Pay Attention to Doors and Entrances
“Spend the money to make openings between rooms as high as possible — anything to get away from the standard, squat 7-foot-tall door. It really creates a sense of openness, lightness, and grandeur in a space.” —Suzanne Lovell

This piece originally appeared on housebeautiful.com